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Riddle Me This,” with mythologist John Bucher, Ph.D.”

Viewing 8 posts - 16 through 23 (of 23 total)
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  • #74624
    jamesn.
    Participant

      Oh Sunbug; thank you so much for the way you opened this out for now we can start to explore the world of the “Trickster God”; the world of Fairytales and magic and solving riddles that refer to the psyche’s ability to dance back and forth between worlds. The Joker, (the Court Jester who always toed the line between humor and poking fun at egos but was tolerated because he served an important function lest things get out of hand). Indeed, Desiderius Erasmus wrote one of the most important literary works of European literature called: “In Praise of Folly”; which was a very short book about a Jester-like figure full of political dynamite because it tread the very fragile line between “church and state” with humor; (otherwise known then as the Catholic Church and the Right of Kings); and you could lose your head along the way by poking fun at either. He managed both with this book later opening the door to debates with Luther on what constitutes; “Free Will”.

      The Tricksters realm of Clowns and riddles contains all sorts of doorways into man’s inner world. “Sanity” itself often looks for answers here as well from childhood tales of: Aesop’s Fables, Mother Goose, Hans Christian Anderson, or Brother’s Grimm to the final Dark “Exit” Gate; And we all use Guardian spirits to help guide us through our own inner sanctuaries to the light world of what we call “reality”; (or: “aren’t they really the same thing?” sometimes as Shakespeare often reminds us throughout his many plays and sometimes “conjures” up: “The Poet” as well. (But why do we always want to play?) I think is an interesting question as well.

      (Oh; and don’t we love to dream and play with the characters we meet along the way). Speaking of: “Tolkien, and “Lord of the Rings” here is a beautiful link that was shared with us back in the older CoaHO Forums years ago. But be forewarned about entering this incredible multi-layered world; although being known as a “Tolkien” reference resource; it’s magic spell will pull you into it with some people being lost for days at time; some even much longer than that. And like Alice’s rabbit hole, looking glass, or Dorothy’s: “Magic Red Slippers” from the: Land of Oz; you may not want to return, but you’ve been through an ordeal to bring back the Boon of adulthood. Star Wars has this same type of realization too; of atonement with the father, with Luke rescuing his father from the dark side but also himself as well. These tales as children teach us valuable lessons that we must learn to incorporate further down the road; (but we must all return sometime from the world of enchantment and make-believe to the grownup world of responsibilities and nightmares that must be faced, and dealt with, and learned from; and then maybe we have brought something worthwhile back to share with others as we continue on to our journeys’ end).

      #74623

      Appreciate your kind words James.
      Tricksters are fun for sure! Isn’t there a cross over into “holy fool?” Seems like Joseph Campbell mentioned that once or perhaps I gleaned it from somewhere else.
      “In Praise of Folly,” very interesting!
      And I’m familiar with jester figures (have danced a few!)

      As for Tolkien ah yes! Not all who wander are lost! And I have delved deeper into some of that background before: Lays of Beleriand and have slipped into a few pages of the Silmarillion, which fascinates me with its Song Creation Tale. Music and Myth interwoven.
      Also fascinating is Tolkien’s claim in one article (wish I could remember) that he felt part of those stories were written through him. That’s psyche deep for sure! Tolkien insisted not allegory, but more of an “imagined,” history. So back to imagination again.
      You ask about the desire to play James…sometimes I wonder if it is a searching for re-connection with something lost? Or a larger part of the human spirit? Maybe the difference between “play,” being a “trivial pursuit,” or a “joyous one.”
      The latter, I feel might open more doors?

       

      And there are many realms of “play.”John mentions “comic con,” and there are “Ren Faires,” too.

      Since you mentioned Shakespeare: to play, a play, players on the stage?

      Some of the perceptions on the theme of this month, also mention a balance and how riddles and word play keep one from taking themselves too seriously.
      Of course if you are in a dangerous riddle game with high stakes, you might disagree!
      Or maybe it’s that old epitaph of when you loose something, sometimes you find it when you stop looking for it!
      Though I’m not sure that is a proper riddle at all! (heh heh.)
      But maybe, some part in the mind and psyche knows play is necessary for clarity as much as concentration.

      Concentration is fine as long as it does not generate stress. Or maybe play means making space for the mind to imagine, so it can return to “this world” refreshed and renewed.

      Einstein: “imagination encompasses the whole world.”
      It occurs, that some great discoveries in the world have happened  by concentration. Yet other great discoveries have happened  spontaneously! (Sometimes almost by accident! Or synchronicity!)

      And thank God, those discoverers had open, willing and ready minds to process these new discoveries!

      Maybe play is just a reminder to keep ourselves open to wonder with eyes to the Horizon as we all sail together on spaceship earth.

      But if you want a “rabbit hole,” then there is John Lennon: “Nothing is Real.” 🎶

      Because after all music can be “played” too!

      #74622

      Sunbug – I very much enjoyed the excerpt of the Proteus chapter you posted above. I have found that Joyce’s work speaks most clearly to me when I read them aloud – not just Ulysses, but the Wake as well. Getting a sense of the rhythm slows the read and allows the images to form and soak my soul.

      In a recent Joseph Campbell Pathways podcast (the September 15 bonus episode on “Mythic Themes in the Work of Mann and Joyce”) Joe begins by regaling the audience with his recitation from memory of the entire first page of Finnegans Wake – a tour de force that sheds light on how to read this seemingly daunting work.

      (Of course, the sounds of surf, seagulls, and musical soundtrack in your selection do enhance the experience.)

      #74621

      Thank you for the link to the podcast Stephen! I thoroughly enjoyed that!
      It was lovely to hear Joseph Campbell read that excerpt. And I’m still smiling!
      Was laughing too!

       

      Thank you!

      #74620

      I think the Ulysses excerpt was provided by Robert. But Thank you Robert for that as well! I enjoyed it very much too!

      So one other question?

      Would “Hink Pinks” and their ilk be considered as “semi-riddles?”

      Hinky Pinky: What does one call a philosophers “walk?”

      “A Campbell Amble.”

      (of course a talk might be a ramble, but in all due respect I love those “rambles.” This is just in good fun. As I have great respect for Joe Campbell.)

       

      Hink Pink: What does one call an “Irish Novelist and Poet’s fancy car?

      “A Joyce Royce”

       

      Hinky Pinky: What does one call a puzzling violin?

      “A Riddle Fiddle”

       

      Hinkity Pinky: What does one call a peculiar “Hobbit?”

      “A Baffling Halfling”

       

       

      #74619
      Participant

        Hello Sunbug ,

        I enjoy riffing on Campbell’s name. Split it into syllables , Camp – Bell . Now there’s something to work with. A stay at Camp Bell does ring true ! The bell of camp Bell is the Bell of the ball baptized in waters of Disney and Dali !!! Quite the surreal experience !!!

         

         

         

        Robert R Reister

        #74618

        Hey Robert – I accidentally posted this reply to Sunbug rather than you  (I became confused as to who posted what!), so am copying it here:

        I very much enjoyed the excerpt of the Proteus chapter you posted above. I have found that Joyce’s work speaks most clearly to me when I read them aloud – not just Ulysses, but the Wake as well. Getting a sense of the rhythm slows the read and allows the images to form and soak my soul.

        In a recent Joseph Campbell Pathways podcast (the September 15 bonus episode on “Mythic Themes in the Work of Mann and Joyce”) Joe begins by regaling the audience with his recitation from memory of the entire first page of Finnegans Wake – a tour de force that sheds light on how to read this seemingly daunting work.

        (Of course, the sounds of surf, seagulls, and musical soundtrack in your selection do enhance the experience.)

        #74617

        I do find a certain significance in the names of many of the thinkers in myth and depth psychology I am drawn to: Campbell and Hillman are fairly straight forward. Then there are our German brethren: Freud (joy), Jung (young), and Zimmer (room – when I read Zimmer, it feels as if I am stepping into a sumptuous and richly apportioned secret chamber).

        And, of course, Joyce certainly weaves allusions to Freud and Jung throughout the Wake.

      Viewing 8 posts - 16 through 23 (of 23 total)
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